Courses 2022-2023

Fall 2022 Undergraduate Courses

Jewish Studies 39

Holy Fanfiction: Retelling Stories from the Bible and Quran

Instructor: Madeline Wyse
CN# 25202
Meeting Time: Mondays/Wednesdays 4:00p to 5:00p
Location: Dwinelle 179
Units: 2

Jews and Muslims of the medieval Islamic world produced a vast literature reimagining and embellishing the tales of famous biblical and quranic figures like Abraham, Joseph, Moses and David. This “holy fanfiction” ranges from poems to romances, mystic parables to cutting satire. It grapples with thorny theological issues, as well as other contemporary concerns, from gender relations to coping with life as a religious minority. We will read and analyze a selection of these tales and pay particular attention to the ways they complicate conceptual boundary lines that we might have taken for granted: the line between Jews and Muslims, between popular culture and scholarly culture, between piety and entertainment.

– Meets Arts & Literature, L&S Breadth
– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Jewish Studies 120.001

Jewish Folktales Around the World: Past and Present, Self and Other

Instructor: Sarah F. Levin
CN# 21653
Meeting Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 5:00p to 6:30p
Location: Dwinelle 87
Units: 3

Folklore helps us make sense of the world we live in at the same time that it entertains us. Curious about dybbuks, golems, genies (jinns)? Want to know the folktales Shakespeare used? Want to learn new Jewish jokes?

In this course, we’ll read a sampling of folktales and jokes from diverse Jewish communities (German, Kurdish, Moroccan, Russian, Yemeni, etc.) while exploring themes such as creativity and artistic expression. We’ll also address gender, group identity and values, stereotypes, and the interactions of Jews and non-Jews. Films, videos, and guest storytellers will complement discussions. Final projects allow students to pursue their interests. Students from all majors and backgrounds are welcome. Conducted in English with readings in English.

– Meets Arts & Literature, L&S Breadth
– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Jewish Studies 120.002

Powerlessness and Superpowers: Comic Books & Jewish Identity

Instructor: Louis Schubert
CN# 33403
Meeting Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 3:30p to 5:00p
Location: Social Sciences Bldg. 80
Units: 3

Coming from exclusion and powerlessness, Jewish creators invented the modern comic book. Comics are where Jewish stories get told, from the Holocaust to daily life. The superhero genre, mostly invented by Jews, narrates core Jewish ethical concepts such as Responsibility to the Other. We will read lots of comics and focus on the overlapping themes of Jewish history, identity, and faith.

– Meets Arts & Literature, L&S Breadth
– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Jewish Studies 123

Islam in Israel

Instructor: Muhammad Al-Atawneh
CN# 33174
Meeting Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 2:00p to 3:30p
Location: Dwinelle 247
Units: 3

Islam is the religion of the majority of the Arab citizens in Israel. Since the late 1970s, Islam has become an important factor in the political and socio-cultural identity of the Arab minority in Israel; thus, the number of Muslims in Israel who define their identity first and foremost in relation to their religious affiliation has steadily grown. Because Islam is a religious code covering all aspects of life, devout Muslims in Israel seek religious guidance from Islamic legal doctrines and other Shari‘a (Islamic law) tenets, not only in spiritual matters but also in matters relating to temporal, social conduct. These Islamic legal norms are, however, at odds with both Israeli secular law and the sociocultural norms of the Jewish majority in Israel.

The intent of this course is to explore the local nature of Islam by the discussion of the evolving religious identity and its impact on the religious and socio-cultural aspects of Muslim life in Israel. Special emphasis will be placed on the dilemmas and tensions stem from the encounter between the Muslim religious norms and the Israeli socio-cultural and legal norms in various areas, e.g., banking, technology, education, gender issues, Jewish/Muslim relations, etc.

– Meets International Studies, L&S Breadth
– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

History 178.001 – CANCELLED

History of the Holocaust

Instructor: John Efron
CN# 30893
Meeting Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 9:30a to 11:00a
Location: Valley Life Sciences 2040
Units: 4

Due to unforeseen circumstances, this course has been cancelled for the Fall 2022 semester. It will be rescheduled for Spring 2023. We regret any inconvenience this may cause and thank you for your understanding.

This course will survey the historical events and intellectual developments leading up to and surrounding the destruction of European Jewry during World War II. By reading a mixture of primary and secondary sources we will examine the Shoah (the Hebrew word for the Holocaust) against the backdrop of modern Jewish and modern German history. The course is divided into three main parts: (1) the historical background up to 1933; (2) the persecution of the Jews and the beginnings of mass murder, 1933-1941; and (3) the industrialized murder of the Jews, 1942-1945.

– Meets Social & Behavioral Sciences, L&S Breadth
– Meets Historical Studies, L&S Breadth
– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Anthropology 189.004

Israel, Palestine, Holy Land: Tourism Imaginaries and Practices

Instructor: Jackie Feldman
CN# 32315
Meeting Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 11:00a to 12:30p
Location: Anthropology/Art Practice Bldg 221
Units: 4

The territory between the Mediterranean and the Jordan has been viewed as the land of the Bible, cradle of civilization, ancestral homeland, tinderbox of conflict or sun-drenched paradise. Through pilgrimage and tourism, Israelis and Palestinians present their own identities and understandings in negotiation with various Western imaginaries. Through the prism of anthropology, we will examine this contact zone as a mirror of Israeli and Palestinian society. Examples will include heritage sites, Christian pilgrimage itineraries, Holocaust memorials, museums, visits to former Palestinian villages, volunteer activism, and gay tourism.

– Meets Social & Behavioral Sciences, L&S Breadth
– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Hebrew 104A

Women’s Hebrew Writing

Instructor: Shirelle Maya Doughty
CN# 33022
Meeting Time: Mondays/Thursdays 3:30-5:00p
Location: Social Sciences Building 252
Units: 3

In this course we will read modern Hebrew poetic and prose works by women that engage with a variety of themes, from Zionist settlement and war to marriage and sex. Even though women have been actively engaged in the shaping of modern Hebrew cultures, their contributions are still often overlooked. We will examine the works of canonical women writers of Hebrew as well as the works of lesser-known writers that have not been translated into English. This course will offer an opportunity to engage with these works directly, since all primary source readings will be in Hebrew. Discussions will also be in Hebrew, and secondary source materials will be in English or Hebrew.

Prerequisite: Two years of college level Hebrew or equivalent.

– Meets Arts & Literature, L&S Breadth
– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Hebrew 202A

Advanced Late Antique Hebrew Texts

Instructor: Daniel Boyarin
CN# 32396
Meeting Time: Tuesdays 2:00-5:00p
Location: Social Sciences Bldg. 248
Units: 3

Historical and literary study of Hebrew and Aramaic Judaic texts (e.g., Talmud and Midrash).

– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Hebrew 1A.001

Elementary Hebrew 

Instructor: Rutie Adler
CN# 21504
Meeting Time: Monday through Friday, 10:00-11:00a
Location: Social Sciences Bldg. 252
Units: 5

– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Hebrew 20A.001

Intermediate Hebrew

Instructor: Rutie Adler
CN# 21471
Meeting Time: Monday through Friday, 11:00a-12:00p
Location: Social Sciences Bldg. 252
Units: 5

– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Hebrew 107A.001

Biblical Hebrew Texts

Instructor: John Hayes
CN# 33847
Meeting Time: Mon, Wed and Fri, 10:00-11:00a
Location: Social Sciences Bldg. 186
Units: 3

– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

History 100M

Marriage in the Middle East: What’s Love Got to Do with It?

Instructor: Dzovinar Derderian
CN# 33399
Meeting Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 11:00a to 12:30p
Location: Wheeler 102
Units: 4

Marriage has always been much more than the relationship between two individuals. In this course through the lens of marriage we will explore the history of the multi-ethnic (i.e., Arabs, Armenians, Turks) and multi-religious (i.e., Christians, Muslims, Jews) Middle East. We will ask how marriage practices and conceptions of marriage transformed across space and time. How did political, ethno-religious, ideological and economic factors in the Middle East shape marriage practices? In turn, we will explore how gender norms and behaviors, norms of sexuality, interethnic and interreligious relations, as well as class relations and economic networks have been shaped through the institution of marriage. We will treat marriage as a social, cultural, economic, political and legal category and construct.

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the history of the Middle East from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century, while getting them to think critically about the institution of marriage on a historical spectrum. The institution of marriage will allow students to grasp the multi-ethnic and multi-religious dynamics of the Middle East, while comparing marriage practices, laws and traditions across religious and confessional communities. We will explore the role of marriage in practices of governance, community building, and also highlight how conceptualizations of marriage have changed through time. Through movies and news articles connections will be made between historic and contemporary practices in the Middle East.

– Meets Historical Studies, L&S Breadth
– Meets Social & Behavioral Sciences, L&S Breadth
– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Legal Studies 190.004

Gender, Religion, and Law: The Case of Israel

Instructor: Masua Sagiv
CN# 16562
Meeting Time: Mondays 3:00-6:00p
Location: Social Sciences 185
Units: 4

The course will explore the intersection of gender, religion, and law in Israel, as manifested in social movement activism through law and society. The course will illustrate and reflect upon different strategies and spheres for promoting social change, by examining core issues involving gender, religion and law in Israel: religious marriage and divorce, gender equality in the religious establishment, spiritual leadership of women, free exercise of religion (at the Western Wall and Temple Mount), conversion, and segregation in education. Spheres of activism to be covered include parliament, state courts, alternative private initiatives and courts, and social media.

– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Legal Studies 190.005

Civil & Human Rights: Israel

Instructor: Michal Tamir
CN# 16563
Meeting Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 3:30 to 5:00p
Location: Etcheverry 3113
Units: 3

Advanced study in law and society. See Course Catalog for more information on seating and enrollments for this class.

– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor

Political Science 124A.001

War!

Instructor: Ron Hassner
CN# 23896
Meeting Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 11:00a to 12:30p
Location: Hearst Field Annex A1
Units: 4

War, what is it good for? Absolutely nothing! Is this necessarily true? Wars are brutal and horrific events, but are they all necessarily the result of miscalculation, accident, or fanaticism? Can war serve a rational purpose? Are wars governed by rules and do states care about these rules? This course is designed for upper-level undergraduate students.

– Meets Historical Studies, L&S Breadth
– Meets International Studies, L&S Breadth
– Meets Social & Behavioral Sciences, L&S Breadth
– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor (See instructor for guidelines.)

Yiddish 103

History of Yiddish Culture in English

Instructor: Alec Burko
CN# 23062
Meeting Time: Tuesdays/Thursdays 12:30 to 2:00p
Location: Dwinelle 134
Units: 3

This course will trace the development of Yiddish culture from the first settlement of Jews in German lands through centuries of life in Eastern Europe, down to the main cultural centers today in Israel and America. The course will examine how changes in Jewish life have found expression in the Yiddish language. It will provide an introduction to Yiddish literature in English translation, supplemented by excursions into Yiddish music, folklore, theater, and film.

– Counts towards the Jewish Studies Minor